Google analytics

Wednesday, 2 February 2011

Memories

video

And I used to do that for a living.

10 comments:

  1. All my family were deep sea fishermen sailing from St Andrews, Hull. Ships were made of steel and so were the men who sailed in them.

    ReplyDelete
  2. We had steel plates bolted onto the outside of the windows, fastened on by the bosun once we'd cleared UK waters. The space between the plates and the glass quickly filled up and stayed that way until Halifax. Like living in a goldfish tank. The entire accomodation was like this, the only place that saw daylight during the voyage was the wheelhouse, master's cabin and radio room. And this was Cunard!
    Brgds
    Peter Melia

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks to all the commentators. As you can see, a life at sea isn't all plain sailing.

    @WOAR.

    Luck

    ReplyDelete
  4. Shippin' 'em green, over the "knacker-crackers" ...

    Still, never a queue in the Main Galley .. eh ?

    Bet you were in the Ship's snooker team as well FE ... ;)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Memories for me, too. The Research Ship 'Challenger', on which I had many working cruises when I worked for the Marine Laboratory in Scotland, behaved like this vessel, but in a less vigorous sea

    ReplyDelete
  6. I still vividly remember coming through Biscay in ballast on an old Blue Flue ship that had been prostituting itself down the west coast to Apapa. http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/85122/title/laertes/cat/510 ;you may have to join to see the photo. 45 and more degrees either way at 04:00 when I went on shift with the fridge in the deck pantry breaking free and chasing me around as I rolled around amongst the chairs, frightening! Then going round Cape Horn it was like a mill pond.

    Daedalus

    ReplyDelete
  7. Woman on a Raft said...
    Why doesn't it fall over?
    Well.....
    It does.
    As you can see from the photos, the little ship is constantly falling over, first one way, and then the other. But what is difficult to see is that every time it falls, it sort of reaches a place were the sea stops it falling, and in fact sort of pushes it back up again. So then it looks around for somewhere else to fall, which happens to be to the other side. So over there it goes, floppo!
    This is good for the crew (and owner, and insurance, and families and so on, since the crews don't drown )
    However there is an inconvenience for the crew, in that cups and glasses and stuff keep falling of the tables onto the floor.
    Good question though, even from a woman.
    Brgds
    Peter Melia

    ReplyDelete
  8. People do that for a living? Here on the land we have Health and Safety!

    ReplyDelete
  9. You can draw parallels with the band of unsung hero's flying to remote and dangerous airstrips bringing supplies and medical aid. They frequently have to contend with dreadful weather conditions, and like mariners, some of them don't always return...

    As for "Elf 'n Safety" - they can go take a running jump......when they've done the risk assessment, and filled in countless forms etc.

    ReplyDelete

Say what you like. I try to reply. Comments are not moderated. The author of this blog is not liable for any defamatory or illegal comments.